234 Female Students Went Missing in Nigeria, and the Media Has Barely Covered It

redzapato:

pallet-town-julie-brown:

faitheboss:

234 schoolgirls in Nigeria, ages 16 to 18, were abducted two days before the South Korean shipwreck. Armed men broke into a school in the northeastern city of Chibok, shot the guards and took the girls away while they were taking a physics exam. The attack has been linked to Boko Haram, a jihadist affiliate of al-Qaida.

So why haven’t we heard about it? Simply put, because the world has very different views on South Korea and Nigeria. One is among the richest countries in the world and a powerful Western ally with a high quality of life and strong international presence. The other is in Africa, where, you know, these things happen all the time — or so we’re led to believe.

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JESUSSSS

boko haram has been effing with Nigeria for 5eva and went on triple duty in April (they didn’t say anything about bus depot bombing either). Like its not even on the first page for African world news…. 

its a hot mess

God

betterknowamicrobe:


thecivilwarparlor:

Biological Warfare In The Civil War~
If true, Blackburn’s plot would have represented one of the earliest attempts at biological warfare.
In the Spring of 1865, Northern newspapers discovered what they believed was a diabolical plot of the Confederacy to infest northern cities and its military with the yellow fever. A Doctor Luke P. Blackburn, serving as a Confederate agent in Canada, allegedly packed clothing which was infested and sent it to northern cities and army bases to be used as second hand clothing. He was arrested, tried and acquitted for lack of proof…. It would be years later before scientists learned the fever can only be transmitted by a type of mosquito.
Historians disagree as to the strength of the evidence against Blackburn, and many of the federal and Confederate records relating to the case have been lost. Writing in the journal America’s Civil War, Navy physician J. D. Haines notes that the Confederate agents who testified against Blackburn were of dubious reputation. Hyams in particular received immunity from prosecution and was paid for his testimony. Haines also points out that Blackburn’s previous reputation as a humanitarian was ignored; in the hysteria following Lincoln’s assassination, conspiracy theories abounded and Northerners were inclined to believe the worst about anyone with Confederate sympathies. The New York Times vilified Blackburn as “The Yellow Fever Fiend” and “a hideous devil”. Historian Edward Steers concedes that the evidence against Blackburn was, circumstancial but in his book Blood on the Moon, he contends that enough evidence survives not only to prove Blackburn’s involvement in the plot, but to show that high-ranking Confederate officials up to and including President Jefferson Davis were aware of, condoned, and financed it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luke_P._Blackburn  
http://www.virology.wisc.edu/virusworld/viruslist.php?virus=yfv

Wow!  This is fascinating.  I’ve got to carve out some blog space for microbes throughout history.
Zoom Info
betterknowamicrobe:


thecivilwarparlor:

Biological Warfare In The Civil War~
If true, Blackburn’s plot would have represented one of the earliest attempts at biological warfare.
In the Spring of 1865, Northern newspapers discovered what they believed was a diabolical plot of the Confederacy to infest northern cities and its military with the yellow fever. A Doctor Luke P. Blackburn, serving as a Confederate agent in Canada, allegedly packed clothing which was infested and sent it to northern cities and army bases to be used as second hand clothing. He was arrested, tried and acquitted for lack of proof…. It would be years later before scientists learned the fever can only be transmitted by a type of mosquito.
Historians disagree as to the strength of the evidence against Blackburn, and many of the federal and Confederate records relating to the case have been lost. Writing in the journal America’s Civil War, Navy physician J. D. Haines notes that the Confederate agents who testified against Blackburn were of dubious reputation. Hyams in particular received immunity from prosecution and was paid for his testimony. Haines also points out that Blackburn’s previous reputation as a humanitarian was ignored; in the hysteria following Lincoln’s assassination, conspiracy theories abounded and Northerners were inclined to believe the worst about anyone with Confederate sympathies. The New York Times vilified Blackburn as “The Yellow Fever Fiend” and “a hideous devil”. Historian Edward Steers concedes that the evidence against Blackburn was, circumstancial but in his book Blood on the Moon, he contends that enough evidence survives not only to prove Blackburn’s involvement in the plot, but to show that high-ranking Confederate officials up to and including President Jefferson Davis were aware of, condoned, and financed it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luke_P._Blackburn  
http://www.virology.wisc.edu/virusworld/viruslist.php?virus=yfv

Wow!  This is fascinating.  I’ve got to carve out some blog space for microbes throughout history.
Zoom Info

betterknowamicrobe:

thecivilwarparlor:

Biological Warfare In The Civil War~

If true, Blackburn’s plot would have represented one of the earliest attempts at biological warfare.

In the Spring of 1865, Northern newspapers discovered what they believed was a diabolical plot of the Confederacy to infest northern cities and its military with the yellow fever. A Doctor Luke P. Blackburn, serving as a Confederate agent in Canada, allegedly packed clothing which was infested and sent it to northern cities and army bases to be used as second hand clothing. He was arrested, tried and acquitted for lack of proof…. It would be years later before scientists learned the fever can only be transmitted by a type of mosquito.

Historians disagree as to the strength of the evidence against Blackburn, and many of the federal and Confederate records relating to the case have been lost. Writing in the journal America’s Civil War, Navy physician J. D. Haines notes that the Confederate agents who testified against Blackburn were of dubious reputation. Hyams in particular received immunity from prosecution and was paid for his testimony. Haines also points out that Blackburn’s previous reputation as a humanitarian was ignored; in the hysteria following Lincoln’s assassination, conspiracy theories abounded and Northerners were inclined to believe the worst about anyone with Confederate sympathies. The New York Times vilified Blackburn as “The Yellow Fever Fiend” and “a hideous devil”. Historian Edward Steers concedes that the evidence against Blackburn was, circumstancial but in his book Blood on the Moon, he contends that enough evidence survives not only to prove Blackburn’s involvement in the plot, but to show that high-ranking Confederate officials up to and including President Jefferson Davis were aware of, condoned, and financed it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luke_P._Blackburn  

http://www.virology.wisc.edu/virusworld/viruslist.php?virus=yfv

Wow!  This is fascinating.  I’ve got to carve out some blog space for microbes throughout history.

We now know that 24 hours without sleep, or a week of sleeping four or five hours a night induces an impairment equivalent to a blood alcohol level of .1 percent. We would never say, ‘This person is a great worker! He’s drunk all the time!’ yet we continue to celebrate people who sacrifice sleep for work.

Insights from the doctor who coaches athletes on sleep. Pair with the science of what actually happens while you sleep and how it affects your every waking hour.

More on sleep here.

(via explore-blog)